Janet's Vintage Finds

Women Who Wore Hats: Pulling off the Vintage Look

Stylish hats are back in style for women who like a vintage look.  But it’s hard for some of us pull off the looks that women achieved in the early decades of the 1900s. Back then, hats were part of everyday styles, whether at the office, nightclub, or Sunday church. Looking back at some pictures from that era illustrates just how adept these women were at picking the perfect hat for any occasion. Below are some photos that I think showcase some of the most attractive pairings.

Vintage Everyday, which stores a trove of nostalgic photos on its web site, recently posted, “50 Vintage Fashion Photos that Reveal Just How Awesome People Used to Dress.” There are so many fun photos in this feature, including some that highlight fashionable hats.

Check out this picture of a crowd on the streets of London in 1908 — people going about their daily business in hats of all shapes and sizes. Note how they pair long dresses and boas with appropriately large brimmed hats with feathers. Even the kids are wearing hats.

vintage hats city streets
Hats in the crowd

This model at a photo shoot in New York City in 1956 sports a jaunty tam. I love how it looks with the cape. I haven’t seen many capes among vintage clothing today but it looks so stylish and comfortable.

new york model vintage hats
A model in NYC in 1956

“A woman’s hat is a part of her outfit as a whole, not an afterthought,” says Solanah at Vixen Vintage. She posted a collection of vintage hat looks on her blog that is worth checking out. She makes the important point that unlike men, women didn’t remove their hats when they entered a room. The hat was not only a necessary complement to her outfit but also integrated with her hairstyle. Hats were often pinned on with the woman’s hair arranged to suit her hat style.

Audrey Hepburn provides a case in point. She didn’t need a hat to look great but she definitely rocks this pink bowler. Note the positioning pinned on the back of her head rather than perched on top. I think it really accentuates her beautiful face and simple pearl earrings.

audrey hepburn pink hat
Audrey in 1962

African American women routinely wore hats to church and on other special occasions in the early part of the century, and some still do today. Vintage Everyday recently posted photos of some of those women from the 1920s-1940s. I was struck by how well they pitched them at the perfect angle and paired them with just the right outfits. Here’s one who appears to be waiting to leave for church, sporting a wide-brimmed straw hat.

vintage wide brimmed hat.
The wide-brimmed hat, perfect for dressing up in hot weather.

Kristina Uriegas-Reyes at xojane has blogged about her love for the pillbox hat. Finding the perfect positioning is key, she says, rightly pointing out that a lot of older hats are too small for the average woman’s head. However many can be worn at an angle using pins or combs.

Here are some of the hats I’ve collected in my recent travels to thrift shops and estate sales. What are your favorites?

vintage hat glenover
The Glenover Beret by Henry Pollack
vintage hat bowler
A wool bowler with front flower embellishment
vintage straw hat
A straw sunhat with open top.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vintage pillbox hat
Taupe pillbox hat with veil

Audrey Hepburn: Painful Childhood Influenced Her Work on Screen and Off

Audrey Hepburn
Audrey Hepburn: “Princess of all our fairy tales,” says People Magazine (Winter 1993)

I came across a 1993 issue of People magazine recently. A Special Collector’s Issue devoted to the life of Audrey Hepburn that came out just after Audrey’s death at age 63, from colon cancer.   I remember saving it and pouring over the pictures. She’s always been my favorite Hollywood star (see my previous post on the style of Audrey and Grace Kelly).

I started reading the articles and was reminded of the difficulties she overcame before rising to stardom. We came to think of her as living among the beautiful and privileged but she first endured a harsh childhood spent partly in Nazi-occupied Holland. Born Edda Hepburn-Ruston on May 4, 1929, in Brussels, Audrey’s first great sorrow was the divorce of her parents when she was just 6. She adored her father and lived with him for a while in London but he mostly ignored her. She later returned to live with her mother–who was of part-Jewish ancestry–in Holland, just before it was invaded by Germany. Over the next few years, her uncle and a cousin were executed by the Nazis.

Audrey Hepburn childhood
Audrey was shy and awkward as a child

Audrey’s mother survived by posing as a pro-German aristocrat but still had her home, property and bank accounts confiscated by the Germans. Audrey’s half-brother was sent to a labor camp after he refused to join a Nazi youth group. The Germans forced the family to evacuate in 1944 and Audrey found herself living in a crowded house in a neighboring village. One day, she was snatched off the streets by German soldiers to work in their military kitchens but escaped to a deserted cellar. There, she nearly died from malnutrition before being rescued by Allied troops in 1945,

The images of war always haunted her and I think this is part of her power on the screen. There are many beautiful movie actresses but, to me, Audrey rose above the pack. She had such a kind face and eyes that could simultaneously express joy and sadness. Think of the scene in Breakfast at Tiffany’s when she’s sitting on the fire escape outside her apartment singing “Moon River.”

Roman Holiday
Audrey and Gregory Peck in “Roman Holiday”

Audrey started off in show business in Holland but her first Hollywood hit was “Roman Holiday,” in 1953, for which she won an Oscar. Soon after came Holly Golightly in “Breakfast,” the part she became most famous for. Here’s how People describes that role’s impact on style and attitudes at the time:

“Holly was the wanton gadfly of the Kennedy generation, with “Moon River” its love song. Young men fell hopelessly in love with Hepburn when she and George Peppard dropped their cat and dog masks and kissed in front of their elevator; young women descended on American’s major cities wearing beehive hairdos and extravagant dark glasses. Daring to be different, defying the world with her wistful exuberance, Holly in 1961 was the pre-dawning of the Age of Aquarius.”

Breakfast at Tiffanys
In Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Breakfast at Tiffanys
With “Breakfast” co-star George Peppard

Her beauty was a mixture of girl-next-door and royal princess. Here’s how the New York Times described her in its obituary:

“Descriptions of her beauty and appeal inevitably included the word “gamine.” She was boyishly slender, with an aristocratic bearing, the trace of a European accent and a hint of mischief. ‘A Wild-Eyed Doe’.”

By the time I came to know Audrey’s work, she was already in her 50s, and I admired her even more as she aged. Her second “career” was working as a roving special ambassador for UNICEF, driven by her own experiences with living in a time of wartime suffering. I remember seeing her on TV visiting children in Ethiopia and other countries. Her celebrity status helped bring needed resources to people suffering during civil wars and famines. She was in Somalia in 1992, just a year before her death.

Audrey Hepburn unicef
Audrey’s second career: ambassador for UNICEF

 

The publisher’s letter notes that People magazine had never before devoted an entire issue to a single movie star. When Audrey died, the staff started sifting through all the information and pictures and finally decided that a mere article could not do justice to Hepburn’s extraordinary life. I completely agree. I hope you enjoy seeing some of the pictures from that issue — I don’t think she ever took a bad photo.

Audrey Hepburn broadway early career
“Gigi” was her first big role in Broadway
Audrey hepburn style
Audrey’s style had a big influence on fashion trends

 

 

Audrey hepburn on bike
Audrey was always stylish, never pretentious

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Source: Content based on articles in the Winter, 1993 Special Issue of People magazine. Photos taken from the same issue.

5 Secrets to Audrey Hepburn’s and Grace Kelly’s Vintage Style

Few of us can be as stylish as 1950s celebrities Grace Kelly and Audrey Hepburn but we can all add some vintage style to our look. Here are 5 tips to creating your own vintage style.

“Vintage” is sometimes equated with “old” but what it really conveys is lasting quality–that’s what I think of when I see Audrey Hepburn or Grace Kelly in old movies. Like fine wines, they seemed to acquire more style and grace with age.

Miriam Webster notes “vintage” can be used to describe “something that is not new but that is valued because of its good condition, attractive design, etc.”

They could have placed Hepburn and Kelly’s pictures beside that definition as examples of vintage in human form. These two actresses defined chic sophistication throughout their lives.

How can we mere mortals borrow some of that style? Here are my thoughts:

  1. Embrace shorter hairstyles. Grace Kelly’s swept, back hairstyles appear so soft and natural. While you may not be able to achieve this exact style, there are a few basic takeaways: shoulder length, no bangs, highlights, waves. Audrey’s perfect facial structure allowed her to rock a pixie cut. While you may not want to go that short, you also don’t need to hide behind your hair.
    grace-kelly-90774_1280
    Grace Kelly’s swept back style.

     

Audrey Hepburn for Givenchy
Audrey’s pixie cut. Photo by Carrie Spritzer via Creative Commons.

2. Don’t over-accessorize. Who doesn’t want to look like Audrey Hepburn in the wee hours of the morning gazing through Tiffany’s display window? Besides the perfect black dress, what’s most memorable are her signature hat and sunglasses. She had a masterful way with accessories. Lesson for us: you don’t need a lot of makeup or flashy jewelry to look elegant. Find a couple of stand-out accessories to define your look.

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Audrey Hepburn’s classic black hat and sunglasses.

3. Forego the knife. Audrey and Grace didn’t have access to a lot of the cosmetic procedures used by stars today but they were still elegant and attractive as they aged (sadly, Grace only made it into her 50s).

audrey-hepburn-old
A still beautiful older Audrey Hepburn. /photo by JC Pons via Creative Commons

4. Invest in quality.  Grace and Audrey were stylish but never trendy. A few quality, signature pieces defined their look. Think Grace’s Hermes bags or Audrey’s orange, double-breasted coat worn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Lesson: Build your wardrobe around a few quality pieces instead of buying a lot of cheaper items based on passing trends.

Grace Kelly with iconic Hermes bag. (From Marie Claire)
Grace Kelly with iconic Hermes Bag (photo from Marie Claire).

Audrey Hepburn's Orange Coat
Audrey Hepburn’s Orange Coat by Givenchy. Photo by Landahlauts via Creative Commons

 

5. Wear Flats. Although 1950s and early 1960s fashion often conjures up images of form-fitting, cinched waist dresses and sleek stilettos, you can achieve a vintage style in flats, too. Personally, I have never gotten used to walking in high heels so even though I realize they look attractive, I think of stilettos as pure torture. Audrey and Grace often wore flats or 1 or 2-inch heels with both dresses and casual outfits.

Audrey wears low heels with her elegant black dress.
Audrey wears low heels with her elegant black dress.
Grace Kelly
Grace Kelly looking casual. Photo by II Giss/ Creative Commons.

 

 

 

Do you like vintage style? How do you achieve it in your everyday or special occasion wardrobe? I’d love to get your input.

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